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Nov 26

Well, we are looking for a new server for one of our larger sites.  In doing so, I figured I would post an invaluable tool.  This website will allow you to find out how fast other servers/places from around the planet are able to get to your IP, or datacenter.  So, if you are looking at a new host, ask them for a test ip, and then start plugging that into some of the links on this page:

http://www.traceroute.org

I suggest documenting some of the results.  These tools will help you make a wise decision on where you server should be located at, and what to expect for latency.

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Nov 26

Throughout my travels today, I found an interesting site.  This site will let you know if a site is down for everyone, or just yourself.  Its a good one to bookmark!

http://downforeveryoneorjustme.com/

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Jun 19

If you need to add a new user to your systemm just run the following commands:

useradd username

That will create a new user, and a new group, for the ‘username’ that you placed in there.  Now, to change the password for that user, run this:

passwd username

The system will ask you to input the password for the ‘username’ you chose twice.  Thats it, make sure you read the article on ssh security on how to make your enviroment more secure.

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Jun 17

There are many things one can do to help keep your ssh access secure on a shared hosting enviroment.  Grab your client (putty links can be found on the software page), log in, and lets go!

  1. The first one, don’t allow it!  Pretty simple huh?  In a shared hosting environment, there are very few reasons why you should allow a user to have ssh.  If you do, make sure you inspect the script(s) they plan on running, and keep an eye on the logs. Read the rest of this entry »
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Jun 12

I am looking for anyone that wished to contribute articles/posts to this site.  If you wish to lend a hand, please reply to this post.  Articles can be anything related to administering a server.  Basic stuff that we sometimes forget how to do is key.  If you end up being a active contributor, I’ll offer you an @solidservers.ca mail account.

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Jun 10

Suhosin, the hardened php project.  If you are having some troubles running some scripts after you’ve installed, you will have to change some of the configuration values.  There are three ways of doing this, however, I’ll only touch on two of them.  Both require you to have root access to the server.  If you want to change values globally (for all sites on the server), then you would add the config changes to the end of your php.ini file.  For example:

suhosin.post.max_vars = 2048
suhosin.request.max_vars = 2048

Read the rest of this entry »

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Jun 10

Well, its now official, welcome to the SolidServers.ca blog.  My intensions for this blog are two fold.  First, I would like any system admin to be able to come here and learn some new stuff, perhaps a different way of doing things, and also, I would like others to contribute.  The second reason for creating this, is because I’ve got a crap memory, and I need to write stuff down so that I can call it up at a later date.  This blog allows me to do both. :)  I hope to be fairly active, I do administer a few servers, and am usaully pressed for time, but I will do my best!

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